War of the Rebellion: Serial 036 Page 0419 Chapter XXXVI. THE YAZOO PASS EXPEDITION, ETC.

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Yesterday we made a reconnaissance in force from our left flank, alarming them very much. A party we have up the river, under Captain Mott, with a field piece, fired three shots into a transport loaded with troops yesterday, doing considerable damage among them, and disabling the boat. These no doubt influenced their retreat. I do not know yet how far they have gone. Will send another telegram shortly.

W. W. LORING,

Major-General.

Lieutenant General J. C. PEMBERTON.

FORT PEMBERTON, April 6, 1863.

The enemy are moving up the Tallahatchee, toward the mouth of Coldwater. The information is not sufficient yet to make it certain that they are going to the Mississippi River. The probability is that it is their intention to do so. We are certain that our shells and shot did great execution in their crowded camps before leaving.

W. W. LORING,

Major-General.

Lieutenant General J. C. PEMBERTON.

FORT PEMBERTON,

Near Greenwood, April 12, 1863

MAJOR: I had the honor to make to you a report of the operations of this command up to March 22, 1863.

The enemy, after getting 100 miles up the Tallahatchee, was heavily re-enforced and returned, fully determined to make a deadly attack upon these works. During their short absence we greatly strengthened our lines, and were fully prepared to give them a warm reception. We waited a short time after their arrival, in the hope that they would muster courage to attack us, but it seems that it failed them in the critical moment. We then commenced the offensive by driving away their laboring parties from the works intended for batteries, and getting our lines of fire upon their camps and the direction of their forces for the support of their pickets.

We commenced shelling on the evening of April 2, and continued through the 3rd and 4th.

In the mean time a forced reconnaissance was made from our left by General Maury. A considerable force was also displayed upon our right. While our fire was destructive to their crowded camps, our action from right to left alarmed them very much, and on the night of April 4 they commenced embarking, and by daylight they were in rapid retreat up the river. We can hear of them steaming toward the Pass. how far they have got we are not fully advised, but think that they will go entirely through to the Mississippi.

I beg leave here to mention that, in consequence of the extensive overflow of both sides of the Tallahatchee and Coldwater Rivers, it was impossible to get to the rivers, except in small canoes. Enterprising and gallant officers of this command-Colonel A. E. Reynolds, Twenty-sixth Mississippi regiment, Lieutenant Henry, SECOND Texas, and Captain George [W.] Mott, commanding a detachment of McCulloch's-made their boats for the purpose. The latter fortunately reached the enemy and fired upon them with small-arms, killing several, and upon one occasion fired three shots from a field piece, which was sent him, into