War of the Rebellion: Serial 036 Page 0310 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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bad, and he whole lot surrounded with a pool of sugar and molasses which had leaked out. * * * Major [J. P.] Carr says it is impossible for him to do more than he does at present, and that he has had to build his store-rooms and warehouses himself.

WALT. S. WINGATE.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF Mississippi AND EASTERN LOUISIANA,

Jackson, April 8, 1863.

Major THEO. Johnston,

Chief Commissary of Subsistence:

The lieutenant-general commanding desires to know whether satisfactory and sufficient arrangements have been made for the receipt and keeping of the beef-cattle coming form beyond the Mississippi River; and he directs that hereafter no contracts for butchering must be made which allows as compensation to the butcher the hides. These must be retained, and kept subject to the control of the quartermaster's department.

I am, respectfully,

J. THOMPSON,

Inspector-General.

JACKSON, April 8 1863.

General STEVENSON, Vicksburg:

Steamer Dot, with 200,000 pounds bacon, reached Big Black this evening. Have arrangements made at once for its transportation.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

JACKSON, April 9, 1863.

General STEVENSON, Vicksburg:

Have ordered 1,500 men form above as rapidly as possible to Rolling Fork. Send small boats to mouth of Sunflower to take them form large boats.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

OFFICE CHIEF OF SUBSISTENCE, DEPT. MISS. AND E. La.,

Jackson, April 10, 1863.

Major R. W. MEMMINGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Jackson, MISS.:

MAJOR: On the 29th ultimo I addressed you a communication in which I asked that all the purchasing officers in the SECOND Military District, as in all other districts, be instructed not to go outside of their districts without authority from me. Will you please inform me if such instructions have been issued? Information from various sources has been furnished me to the effect that agents from the several military districts are being sent out in every direction, producing conflict and confusion in the purchase of supplies. I quote from a letter received this day from Red River:

There have been a good many outside commissaries or agents from Port Hudson and Vicksburg, who, instead of facilitating the shipment of articles necessary for the army,