War of the Rebellion: Serial 036 Page 0309 Chapter XXXVI. GENERAL REPORTS.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF Mississippi AND EASTERN LOUISIANA,

Jackson, April 7, 1863.

[VICTOR F. WILSON,]

President Southern Railroad:

SIR: The lieutenant-general commanding the department instructs me to say that the shipment of Government supplies and stores to Vicksburg is much too slow for the requirements of the service; that he desires that you will give your attention to this, and employ more cars in this transportation, and, further, that he thinks one day in the week is all that should be allowed for shipment of private freights.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. TAYLOR,

Aide-de-Camp.

JACKSON, April 7, 1863.

General John S. BOWEN,

Grand Gulf, via Port Gibson:

Send a boat to Saint Joseph for 1,500 sacks of corn there.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF Mississippi AND EASTERN LOUISIANA,

Jackson, April 7, 1863.

Judge Z. L. NABERS, Carrollton, Ala.:

SIR: General Pemberton has directed General Ruggles to allow you

to purchase the amount of corn mentioned in your letter in Noxubee and Lowndes Counties, and ship it for the use of the destitute families of volunteers now absent in the service, on the conditions and in the manner prescribed in your letter.

Yours, very respectfully,

J. THOMPSON,

Inspector-General.

APRIL 8, 1863.

* * * * * * * * * * * When I arrived at Port Hudson, the steamer Red Chief was lying at the landing loaded with corn in shuck. A detail was ordered to unload her. * * * One portion of the detail procured coal hods (holding each about a bushel of corn), and carried the corn to the edge of the bank, where they deposited it. The other portion of the detail stood on board the boat, and threw the corn on shore ear by ear. Had proper care been taken in discharging the boat, and the corn been deposited 10 or 12 yards farther from the edge of the bank, no corn would have been lost; whereas it was deposited upon the very edge of the bank, and when the pile got to a certain height, almost every load form the hods when deposited upon the top would roll down into the river. In this manner, could we ascertain with any certainty the amount of corn which has been sunk at the landing at Port Hudson, we would find that we have suffered an almost incredible loss in that item alone, and all through neglect. * * * On the bluff there was sugar, salt, and molasses, which had been lying there for more than a month, the molasses being on end, with the sugar and salt piled upon it, the cooperage being very