War of the Rebellion: Serial 036 Page 0034 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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place he turned up was at Newton, about 30 miles east of Jackson. From there he has gone south, touching at Hazlehurst, Byhalia, and various other places. The Southern papers and Southern people regard it as one of the most daring exploits of the war. I am told the whole State is filled with men paroled by Grierson.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

GRAND GULF, MISS., May 3, 1863.

VIA MEMPHIS, TENN., May 7.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

We landed at Bruinsburg April 30. Moved immediately on Port Gibson. Met the enemy (11,000 strong) 4 miles south of Port Gibson at 2 a. m. on the 1st, and engaged him all day, entirely routing him, with the loss of many killed and about 500 prisoners, besides the wounded. Our loss about 100 killed and 500 wounded. The enemy retreated toward Vicksburg, destroying the bridges over the two forks of Bayou Pierre. These were rebuilt, and pursuit continued until the present time. Besides the heavy artillery at this place, four field pieces were captured, some stores, and the enemy driven to destroy many more. The country is the most broken and difficult to operate in I ever saw.

Our victory has been most complete, and the enemy thoroughly demoralized.

Very respectfully,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General, Commanding.

GRAND GULF, MISS., May 6, 1863.

VIA CAIRO, ILL., May 8.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I learn that Colonel Grierson, with his cavalry, has been heard of; first about ten days ago, in Northern Mississippi. He moved thence and struck the railroad 30 miles east of Jackson, at a point called Newton's Station. He then moved southward toward Enterprise, demanded the surrender of the place, and gave one hour's grace, during which General Loring arrived. He left at once, and moved toward Hazlehurst, on the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad. At this point he tore up the track; thence to Byhalia, 10 miles farther south on the same road; thence eastward on the Natchez road, where he had a fight with Wirt Adams' cavalry. From this point he moved back, to the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad, to Brookhaven, 10 miles south of Byhalia. When last heard from, he was 3 miles from Summit, 10 miles south of the last-named point, supposed to be making his way to Baton Rouge. He had spread excitement throughout the State, destroying railroads, trestle-works, bridges, burning locomotives and railway stock, taking prisoners, and destroying stores of all kinds. To use the expression of my informant, "Grierson has knocked the heart out of the State. "

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General, Commanding.