War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0936 Chapter XXXV. KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Chattanooga, July 29, 1863.

Major-General WHEELER, Commanding Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs me to advise you that the enemy is pressing the command of Colonel Roddey.

I am, general, very respectfully, &c.,

GEORGE WM. BRENT.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Chattanooga, July 29, 1863.

Major-General WHEELER, Commanding Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: In reply to your communication of the 24th instant, asking authority to recruit owners and overseer of slaves, who have been exempted heretofore, in the cavalry, the general commanding directs me to say that he cannot confer such power.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE WM. BRENT.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE, July 29, 1863.

Brigadier-General [A. E.] JACKSON:

GENERAL: Information has been received at these headquarters that about 200 bushwhackers are expected to meet and control the election to be held an August 6 on the waters of Brigadier Creek, southeast of newport about 15 miles. The point is in Cocke Country, thirteenth civil district. The major-general commanding directs that you have a sufficient force sent secretly, if possible, to [such] person and prevent illegal voting.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

J. N. GALLEHER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAS DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, July 29, 1863.

General W. J. HARDEE, Morton, Miss.:

Do the necessities of our situation allow any, and what portion, of the force under your immediate command to be sent to the aid of General Bragg? Prepare such force, if disposable, for early movement. In General Johnston absence, I telegraph you direct.

J. A. SEDDON.

Honorable JAMES A SEDDON, Secretary of War:

Lieutenant-General Hardee has just shown me your dispatch of yesterday. Since dispatch to you of this morning, he has received from an officer of scouts a report contradicting the information communicated in it. We have, therefore, nothing clear as to the enemy's intentions. As you say nothing of General Bragg's instructions, we cannot judge between his wants and those of Mississippi. If he is threatened, I would send this infantry and artillery, except two brigades for Mobile, to join him for a battle. Infantry and artillery a little below 20,000.

J. E. JOHNSTON.