War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0862 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

Search Civil War Official Records

Brigadier General W. PRESTON,

Abingdon, Va.:

Received from General Gracie the following telegram:

A regiment of mounted Federal infantry passed into Harlan Country yesterday, via Moore Creek; they may intend entering Southwestern Virginia.

V. SHELIHA,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENNESSEE, Beechwood, June 5, 1863.

General BRAGG:

GENERAL: I have received your telegram giving information that a heavy wagon train had left Nashville for Murfreesborough. An advance may or not be contemplated by the enemy, but whether intended or not we should be prepared to meet it. I have thought that my command is too much scattered for easy concentration. One brigade (Brown's) is at Jacobs' Store: another is between that point and Fairfield (Bate's), and a third (Johnson's) is at Fairfield. Cleburne's division is at Wartrace, with one brigade at Bellbuckle. An enterprising enemy could force a passage through Liberty Gap and cut my command in two, dividing the force about Hoover's Gap from the force about Wartrace and Bell buckle. It seems to me the Hoover's Gap is too far removed to be defended stubbornly unless with a large force, for it can be turned by Readyville and Bradyville. If it is your wish to dispute the passage of Hoover's Gap, the brigade ought to remain; otherwise it ought to be brought nearer to Wartrace.

The dispositions of my forces were made with the belief we should fight at Tullahoma, and it that view the concentration would be easy. If it is your intention to fight elsewhere, other dispositions should be made.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENNESSEE, Beechwood, June 5, 1863.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Commanding.

GENERAL: I received, this afternoon, an order from Lieutenant-Colonel [J. H.] Hllonquist to send back to the reserve the batteries of Lumsden and Havis, recently ordered to this corps. I know nothing of the batteries ordered to replace them, except that one of them has but two guns. It is not my habit to complain, but if you have any good batteries, you owe it to me and to yourself that my corps should have them. I can see no good likely to result from the change. The three batteries sent away to Mississippi were in perfect order. I have no reason to complain of the batteries now with me (Lumsden's and Havis'), and I wish, if no good reason exists to the contrary, to have them remain.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.