War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0858 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA.Chapter XXXV.

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Early Thursday morning Colonel Roddey crossed the river at Florence, and in half an hour afterward met the enemy.

There was skirmishing all day Thursday and succeeding days until Sunday morning, when scouts left Iuka, and enemy seemed to be falling back down the river. Enemy burned factory and other buildings at Florence.

One hundred and fifty tories passed through Iuka on Wednesday, going toward Tuscumbia Valley.

Respectfully, &c.,

C. R. BARTEAU,

Lieutenant-Colonel.

HEADQUARTERS MORGAN'S DIVISION, Sparta, June 2, 1863.

Major E. S. BURFORD,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Wheeler's Corps:

MAJOR: The laves reports from Clinton and Wayne Counties are to the effect that the enemy have advanced in heavy force to the north bank of the Cumberland, and are threatening a crossing. I forwarded last evening a report from Colonel [D. H.] Smith. By that report the danger is clearly seen. In the event of the withdrawal of any large bodies of troops from that point, would there not be great danger of the enemy's making and inroad? I therefore asked the question on the back of the report whether, under this new state of affairs, I should not await fur their orders before removing one of my brigades.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN H. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT Numbers 2,

Numbers 17.

Tullahoma, Tenn., June 2, 1863.

I. Major J. J. Walker, chief commissary, having received the appointment of chief commissary of the State of Alabama, is relieved form duty in this department, and after having turned over to Major G. M. Hillyer, acting chief commissary, the public money and property in his possession, will report for duty to the Commissary-General, at Richmond.

II. The general commanding parts with Major Walker with regret. Chief of a most important and necessary department of this army, he has not failed to make his capacity felt. His services cannot be too highly appreciated. From the Gulf to the borders of Ohio, from the Mississippi to the headwaters of the Tennessee, he had grasped and controlled the resources of the country, made them sustain its army, and by labor and organization created abundance where scarcity was threatened. It is a source of gratification that, while retiring from his position with this army, he enters upon another sphere of duty, where his usefulness will not be entirely lost to it.

By command of General Bragg:

H. W. WALTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT Numbers 2,

Numbers 18.

Tullahoma, Tenn., June 2, 1863.

The enemy has seen fit to expel from his lines and send to our midst not only those supposed to be guilty of crimes, but non-combatants