War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0836 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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I am greatly concerned by the threatening attitude of Burnside in Kentucky, and would like very much to know what troops you have to resist his advance if he attempts it. I have some hopes that Hooker's defeat in Virginia and the excitement consequent on Vallandigham's arrest in Ohio, will deter the enemy from moving Burnside's army so far into our country. A few days ought to determine that. The troops I sent to Northwestern Virginia, under Imboden, and those under Brigadier General W. E. Jones, have succeeded in doing great damage to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and have procured many horses and cattle.

Please communicate with me freely and fully. I will with pleasure co-operate with you and aid you to the extent of my ability.

Very respectfully and truly, yours,

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Numbers 104.

Tullahoma, Tenn., May 14, 1863.

I. All sick, disabled, or convalescent officers and privates able to be removed will forthwith be sent to the hospital in the rear.

II. All surplus camp furniture and baggage of the army beyond that necessary for marching will be sent to the rear.

By command of General Bragg:

H. W. WALTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, Tenn., May 14, 1863.

Brigadier-General PEGRAM, Via Clinton:

GENERAL: I am instructed by Major-General Buckner to say that no reports have been received from you since leaving for Kentucky. I is important that the commanding general should be advised regularly of your own movements, and of the position and strength of the enemy, so far as they may be know. A report from the front, not yet confirmed, states that Burnside, with about 15,000 men, has passed Barboursville in the direction of Big Creek Gap. If this is true, your forces should operate vigorously upon his flank and rear, with the view of retarding his movements and destroying his supplies. The major-general commanding will expect at least daily reports from you.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

J. N. GALLEHER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., May 15, 1863.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON,

Commanding, &c., Jackson, Miss.:

DEAR GENERAL: I am sure you will appreciate the motives which induce me to offer for your consideration the following general views on the coming summer campaign, which, if they coincide with your own, might, if not already done, be submitted by you to the War Department.

Certainly the surest way to relieve the State of Mississippi and the valley of the Mississippi from the presence of the enemy's army is sud-