War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0821 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Near Wartrace, May 7, 1863.

Brigadier General W. W. MACKALL, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: It is due to myself to state that my corps has not sufficient transportation with it to move, and in the event I am ordered to advance or retire, I should be compelled to leave or destroy a part of my baggage. I have brought forward all the wagons I could spare, keeping in the rear only wagons enough to supply the command with forage. To prevent misconception, I will add that the command is not supplied with the limited allowance of wagons by orders from army headquarters. To complete the allowance, I should be compelled to bring forward wagons from the rear, which I should be glad to do if I can be supplied otherwise with forage.

Very respectfully,

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS HARRISON'S CAVALRY BRIGADE,

May 7, 1863.

Major General JOSEPH WHEELER,

Commanding Cavalry Corps, McMinnville, Tenn.:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of last night is received. My brigade inspector is now charged to select an encampment at Snow Hill or Liberty. Snow Hill is of but little value as a position of defense to a small force, as it is turned by convenient roads on the right and left. I shall be greatly troubled to get forage at either place. The country appears to be entirely exhausted. Heretofore my supply has ben drawn mostly from the other side of the river, which, besides being exhausted, is now beyond impassable waters. Citizens inform me that the river will not be fordable in two weeks, or that it will be past fording for one week after the rains cease.

In my last dispatch I requested to be informed in regard to the strength and positions of the cavalry forces near me. This request was not noticed in your dispatch. I hope it was not considered improper. I still think that I should know the positions, at least, of the cavalry forces on my left, that I might communicate with them, if necessary. This communication might be serviceable to both commands.

I will be much obliged to Major Burford to forward the accompanying letter to Major Jack, and also to forward to me any letters which may reach headquarters. I thank you for the expression of your approval of the manner in which I executed the city with which I was recently charged. I feel sure that I shall secure your approbation whenever I deserve it.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. HARRISON,

Colonel, Commanding Cavalry Brigade.

P. S.-Could Major Burford send me a few envelopes?

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, May 7, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON, Secretary of War:

MY DEAR SIR: I received with much pleasure your letter of in