War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0817 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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figures to be given, and to go on at once with their work. One of the parties leaves this afternoon to begin operations. Mr. Yocom refers to Major [J. J.] Walker for testimonials of his reliability.

The commissary arrangements in this district look well. They have about 250,000 pounds of salt meat in depot, and about 2,000 head of cattle either herded or engaged. This meat has been secured chiefly by exchange for sugar and molasses, and is still accumulating. I am in hopes that enough will be gotten to justify sending forward some to the Tennessee army.

The daily ration now is for 10,000 men; 7,500 of these are negroes working on fortifications. I think it would be well to see if some arrangements could not be made by which the planters could be induced to supply their own negroes, and this heavy drain on the provision depot be prevented. Besides, I should think that the work on the fortifications had sufficiently advanced to dispense with the services of at least half of them. I would suggest that this matter be inspected.

So soon as the enemy's operations on the Mississippi permit, the parties who have sugar up the Red River propose to bring it forward on the terms agreed upon.

Faithfully,

A. D. BANKS,

Major, &c.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. POLK'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENN.,

Numbers 36.

Shelbyville, May 5, 1863.

The lieutenant-general commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to his corps another signal victory of our gallant comrades of the Army of the Potomac over the common enemy. Offering you his congratulations on this new proof of the high qualities which distinguish our associates in arms, and the favor with which their efforts continue to be crowned, he submits the following dispatch just received:

MILFORD, May 3, 1863.

President DAVIS, Richmond, Va.:

Yesterday General Jackson penetrated rear of the enemy, and drove him from all his positions from the Wilderness within 1 mile of Chancellorsville. He was engaged at same time in front by two divisions of Longstreet. This morning the battle was renewed, and enemy driven from all his positions around Chancellorsville, and driven back toward Rappahannock, over which he is now retreating. Many prisoners were taken, and the enemy's loss is heavy in killed and wounded. We have again to thank Almighty God for a great victory. I regret to say that General Paxton was killed, General Jackson severely wounded, and Generals Heth and A. P. Hill slightly.

LEE.

By command of Lieutenant-General Polk:

THOMAS M. JACK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS VOLUNTEER AND CONSCRIPT BUREAU,

ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Huntsville, Ala., May 5, 1863.

Brigadier-General MACKALL,

Chief of Staff, &c.:

SIR: The recent movements of the enemy upon the left and rear of this position was evidently a well-conceived and well-digested plan of a wily foe to reach the rear of General Bragg's army and the heart of the interior, for the purpose of destroying the supplies upon which the

52 R R - VOL XXIII, PT II