War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0808 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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tion of Liberty. You appear to be particularly anxious to have Snow Hill held. I find, on consultation with General Morgan, that it will probably be late to-morrow before Colonel [B. W.] Duke can possibly reach Liberty. Under all the circumstances, I think you would be pleased if I could hold Snow Hill until General Morgan's forces can arrive. I have, therefore, ordered four companies of Texas Rangers and my two light 6-pounders to Liberty, to remain until the arrival of General Morgan's forces.

You will please advise me what disposition to make of Harrison's brigade upon his return. I particularly desire, except when circumstances prevent, that all orders for my command may be transmitted through me. As soon as Mr. Weems returns, I will forward all the captured money that was turned over to me. Most of the officers have sent in certificates that General Orders, Numbers 4, has been complied with. I have this morning written to brigade commanders to be punctual, in compliance with the order.

Most respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

JNO. A. WHARTON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Cavalry Division.

HEADQUARTERS MORGAN'S DIVISION,

Sparta, May 2, 1863.

Major E. S. BURFORD,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: No orders directing me to move my command to Liberty, &c., have ever been received by me until this morning, when an extract from Special Orders, Numbers 22, arrived. Had such orders been received by me, they would, of course, have been promptly attended to. Command has been sent, as directed.

Very respectfully, major,

JOHN H. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Dublin, May 2, 1863.

Major General DABNEY H. MAURY,

Knoxville, Tenn.:

GENERAL: I received this morning a telegram from the Adjutant and Inspector General, communicating one from General Johnston of yesterday's date, to the effect that the reports of his scouts in Kentucky indicated an invasion of East Tennessee by a strong force, under Burnside, and asking if re-enforcements could not be sent from Western Virginia to East Tennessee. The Secretary of

War directs me to furnish the aid if in my power, but to exercise my judgment in the matter.

I have already informed you by letter of the 29th April of the troops I have at and near Saltville, the extreme left of my line. I have, besides, 1,500 or 1,600 men operating with Brigadier-General Imboden in the northwest of this State. They were in Upshur County on the 28th April. I have orders, besides, to send all the cavalry I have available to General Lee; and I have, besides, information that re-enforcements (five regiments) have been sent to the enemy in the Kanawha Valley. Under these circumstances I cannot, without a positive order, detach another man from my immediate front.