War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0772 KY., MID., AND E. TENN., N., ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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President and others in authority, the necessity and importance of entering at once into negotiations for procuring supplies from the enemy or the friends of the enemy, by exchanging cotton with them. I am assured this can be successfully done; indeed I have, within the last few days, had propositions made by enterprising, responsible, energetic, and loyal parties to undertake, it and have the best of reasons for believing the enterprise will at least partially succeed. In addition to this mode of procuring supplies, much may, and I hope will, be done in bringing supplies from foreign ports. This matter has been presented to and I suppose considered by the Commissary Department. If it meets the sanction and approval of the Administration, I will do what I can in organizing and negotiating for these enterprises. I feel much interest; indeed, I feel that everything depends on the question of subsistence, and I feel the importance of straining every nerve at once and without delay, to increase our present limited and fast decreasing stock of subsistence.

If there is any other information desired from me, which I may have omitted in this report, please indicate it and it will be my pleasure to furnish it. I believe I have omitted to mention the fact that I at this time occupy with Government stores, in this place, eighteen ware-houses, some twelve or fourteen of which have been without guards for the last two or three weeks, for the reason (as the commander of the post informs me) that, under recent orders, the provost-guard has been so much reduced that he could furnish guards for only three posts. In the mean time considerable quantities of supplies have been stolen, as has been fully developed within the past few days. I have for many days been promised that my stores should be guarded, and for that reason I have not employed private watchmen. Up to this time, however, I have not been advised of any increase in guard. I think this matter deserves your immediate attention.

For further particulars of the operations of my department, I refer you to the inclosed reports, together with my recent reports to the Department at Richmond.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[J. F. CUMMINGS,

Major and Commissary of Subsistence.]

[Sub-Inclosure.]

Copy of a report made to the Commissary-General by Major J. F. Cummings, Commissary of Subsistence, C. S. Army.

DRIED BEEF.

Pounds.

Killed and dried at-

Atlanta, Ga.(estimated).................................. 45,000

Dalton, Ga. (estimated).................................. 27,000

Cartersville, Ga. (estimated)............................ 90,000

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Total.................................................... 162,000

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BACON AND BULK PORK.

At Atlanta, Ga.-

83,000 bacon and bulk hams............................. 996,000

78,225 bacon and bulk shoulders........................ 990,000

23,020 bacon rumps..................................... 75,000

29,140 jowls........................................... 203,980

101,191 bacon and bulk sides........................... 2,269,175

500 boxes sides, say................................... 200,000

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4,734,155