War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0695 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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the fire of the pickets. Their nearest picket is at College Grove. To-night we perceive large fires in the direction of Versailles.

Yours, respectfully,

ZENAS MOODY.

[Indorsement.]

This information is perfectly reliable.

P. D. RODDEY,

Colonel, Commanding.

MARCH 14, 1863-4.30 p.m.

General LEONIDAS POLK:

GENERAL: I destroyed the order, a copy of which you call for. I remember the substance. I had no adjutant with me, and was fearful it might fall into the hands of the enemy by carelessness. The enemy have not yet advanced. If everything is quiet in the morning, I will call upon you, with Colonel Malone.

Respectfully, general,

JNO. A. WHARTON,

Brigadier-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

No. 67. Tullahoma, March 14, 1863.

I. Brigadier-General Martin, Provisional Army, is hereby ordered to report, with his staff, to Major-General Wheeler, commanding cavalry division, for assignment to duty.

* * * * * * *

By command of General Bragg:

KINLOCH FALCONER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ATLANTA, March 15, 1863.

[General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON:]

GENERAL: I inclose you copies of communication sent to Colonel Ewell in your absence, touching the matter of my present errand. I send these copies, as the colonel suggested that the reports had better be referred to General Bragg.

Major Cummings to-day informs me that the agents sent by him last week into Middle Tennessee and Northern Alabama report a most encouraging prospect. They are much embarrassed for transportation to collect the supplies at depots on the railroad, the country having been stripped completely of every description of wagons and carts. Would it not be well to call General Bragg's attention to this matter, and get him to order his chief quartermaster to furnish a certain amount of transportation to be employed for this purpose? Cummings reports encouragingly as to the probable success of Pegram and Williams in Kentucky. He expects confidently from 6,000 to 7,000 head of stock from this source alone. I think my conversations and suggestions have had the effect of stimulating him to renewed exertions. The truth is, the supplies are in the country; all that is wanted is energy and industry in collecting them. I leave this evening with the intention of