War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0687 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

from Colonel Roddey in reference to Van Dorn, from which it will be seen he is safe.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. A. WHARTON,

Brigadier-General.

CHAPEL HILL, March [12], 1863-10 a.m.

General POLK,

Shelbyville:

No additional news from the enemy. General Van Dorn's command passed during the night, the last regiment about sunrise. He left no intimation that I know of his future movements. I am now picketing all the road between this and Columbia, Caney Spring, and Raleigh Hill. We have 200 pickets on duty at this time, besides four scouting parties in front of the pickets on the leading roads.

Colonel [J.] Hagan and Lieutenant-Colonel [A. J.] Hays, of General Bragg's [staff], staid here last night, and left this morning.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. D. RODDEY,

Colonel, Commanding.

CHAPEL HILL, March 12, 1863.

General LEONIDAS POLK,

Shelbyville, Tenn.:

GENERAL: My scouts are some of them in from College Grove. All they gather from that vicinity indicates that the force encamped at the forks of the pike amounts to one brigade; that Jefferson C. Davis' division went forward toward Franklin. Some rumors to the effect that they are fortifying at Triune are circulating, but they did not ascertain anything which was deemed reliable upon that subject.

Very respectfully,

P. D. RODDEY,

Colonel.

CHAPEL HILL, March 12, 1863.

General LEONIDAS POLK,

Shelbyville, Tenn.:

DEAR SIR: I have no report from the enemy in any direction. Everything seems quiet to-day. Their pickets stand at the same [points] to-day they did yesterday evening, on the Triune pike.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. D. RODDEY,

Colonel.

HOOKER'S, Thursday, [March] 12, 1863-12 m.

Lieutenant-General POLK:

GENERAL: Not hearing from the front during last night nor early this morning, I thought it best to ride on to Unionville myself, and have just returned from Colonel Russell's command. A courier was met on the way from Van Dorn to you, reporting that Van Dorn was at the bridge last night. He is, of course, now across Duck River.

Russell had not heard from Roddey this morning, and we take it for granted the latter is undisturbed at Chapel Hill. Russell's pickets exchanged shots this morning with a small body of the enemy's cavalry, the latter soon retiring. Russell thinks they have retired to Versailles, which is said to be 8 miles from Unionville. There is probably a brigade