War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0685 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

powerful army in front of it with confidence. On that account Major-General Van Dorn's cavalry was added. Dividing that army might be fatal to it. Major-General [Samuel] Jones reported some time ago that the enemy was sending troops from the Kanawha Valley. Soon after, our friends about Nashville informed General Bragg that Major-General Cox had arrived with his division from Western Virginia, and, a little later, that Major-General Sigel's division had also joined Rosecrans. I therefore suggested that the troops which had been opposed to those divisions in Virginia should be sent to General Bragg without delay. Allow me to repeat that suggestion.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

MOBILE, March 12, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON:

There are no resources under my control to meet the advance you refer to. On the contrary, I have repeatedly asked for re-enforcements for all the departments you mention. As the enemy has certainly sent troops from Virginia to Middle Tennessee, we ought to do the same without delay. Troops will not be likely to move from Corinth until Rosecrans advances.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

MOBILE, March 12, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, Richmond:

General Bragg reports the enemy 10,000 strong, pressing Van Dorn back.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

MOBILE, March 12, 1863.

General BRAGG,

Tullahoma:

I hope that we may have troops to prevent the enemy's crossing at Columbia.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

MOBILE, March 12, 1863.

General PEMBERTON:

GENERAL: The supplies of sugar and molasses for the troops here and in Tennessee come through Vicksburg. I need not tell you how important those supplies are to the troops in these times of scarcity of meat. The returning trains from Vicksburg can bring valuable quantities without delaying the transportation of subsistence stores to this place. Please direct that this be done. Other departments have greater difficulty in obtaining food than yours.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.