War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0666 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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to his dispatch to you of this morning. The general supposes that General Van Dorn will communicate with you to-day, and will inform you as to the feasibility of the projected movement. Its success must depend upon the detached position of the force upon which you propose to act. If it has fallen back, as reported by Russell's scouts, upon Holt's Corners, it may be beyond your reach. Of this, however, you will be the judge. You must be sure of the intelligence that the enemy has fallen back, and that he is beyond your reach, before you retire from the front. The general suggests, therefore, that if you do come in this evening, that you make it late.

Very respectfully, &c.,

--- ---,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. WITHERS' DIV., POLK'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENN.,

Six and a half miles from Shelbyville, March 7, 1863.

Major [THOMAS M.] JACK,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Polk's Corps:

MAJOR:Your dispatch of to-day at 1.30 is received. The former dispatch of the lieutenant-general to which you refer me, has not come to hand. There is no enemy in front to-day this side of Eagleville, where Russell's scouts report about 3,000 cavalry and infantry. Colonel [J. S.] Prather reports that he reoccupied Middleton to-day, which the enemy burned yesterday.

Have not heard positively from Roddey to-day, but Russell's scouts continue to report Chapel Hill evacuated by the enemy.

I have had nothing from General Van Dorn as yet. Indeed, it would be out of my power to move my artillery across, in the direction of Chapel Hill or Holt's Corners, in the present condition of the roads.

I shall remain here to-night, in hopes to hear from General Van Dorn.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

PATTON ANDERSON,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. WITHERS' DIV., POLK'S CORPS, ARMY OF TENN.,

Six and half miles from Shelbyville, March 7, 1863-9 p.m.

Major THOMAS M. JACK,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: Up to sundown this evening all was quiet in our front. I have yet been unable to discover any indications of a general advance on the part of the enemy. Our line (except Roddey's link) are in their former positions. I have not been able to hear directly from Roddey. A courier was dispatched to him at dark, to learn the position of affairs in his region. Russell's scouts report the enemy to have fallen back in his (Roddey's) front. I expect to hear from him by or before daylight.

Your first dispatch, to which allusion was made in your second, was only received at sundown to-day. It had gone to General Deas, and was sent by him to me. No enemy in front of me this side of Eagleville. Will keep you advised.

PATTON ANDERSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-Nothing from General Van Dorn yet.