War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0628 KY.,MID.AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXV.

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Twenty-eighth Ohio, from Camp Piatt, about 9 miles above Charleston, all going down the river, and the men said they were going to Tennessee. This man further reports that the citizens in the valley were under the impression that the whole force of the enemy would very soon be withdrawn from the valley. This report confirms other reports I have of the movements of troops from Northwestern Virginia to Tennessee. I believe there are still about three regiments of infantry, two field batteries, and two or three companies of cavalry at Fayette Court-House, where large quantities of supplies have been accumulated-probably enough for the winter-and a plank road has been constructed-probably enough for the winter- and a plank road has been constructed over Cotton Hill. The accumulation of troops in Tennessee and Kentucky induces me to believe that, if any attempt is made to destroy the Salt-Works in Smythe and Washington Counties and the railroad, it will be made from Southeastern Kentucky or East Tennessee. The dividing line between my department and the Department of East Tennessee passes directly through the Salt-Works, and the most practicable approaches to the Salt-Works are through what is now the Department of East Tennessee.

I addressed you on the- ultimo, asking to be informed what disposition of troops had been made to guard those approaches, but I have not received the information.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, February 10, 1863.

Respectfully referred to General J. E. Johnston, commanding, for his information.

By command of the Secretary of War:

H. L. CLAY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS VOLUNTEER AND CONSCRIPT BUREAU, Columbia, February 5, 1863.

Major THOMAS M. JACK,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

This place is very much threatened by the enemy. A division of infantry, 1,500 cavalry, with fifteen pieces of artillery, are on this side of Franklin, and the cavalry are ravaging and plundering the country as far as the neighborhood of Spring Hill. I have only two small regiments of cavalry; no infantry; no artillery. We have about one hundred and fifty wagon-loads of commissary stores, and no means of transportation; forty wagon-loads of bacon, flour, and wheat-perhaps more. I am removing the ordnance stores to the rear. If I had a battery of artillery, the place might be held until all was removed. If any transportation could be sent for these stores, it might be the means of saving what may otherwise be lost.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GID. J. PILLOW,

Brigadier-General C. S. Army, and Chief of Bureau.

P. S.-Major [Henry D.] Bulkley has come, and says he will have 80 wagons here to-morrow. All of our stores of every kind would load, I suppose, 200 wagons. I send forward another lot of volunteers.