War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0615 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. - UNION.

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These reports will be passed through the ascending channel of communication to the commanding general, who will forward the same, with such remarks as he may deem necessary, to the Adjutant and Inspector-General, for the action of the President.

By command of General Bragg:

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

No. 18. Tullahoma, January 24, 1863.

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X. The hospitals of this army at Atlanta, Ga., and along the railroad from Chattanooga to that point, are hereby assigned to the District of the Tennessee, commanded by Brigadier-General Jackson.

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By command of General Bragg:

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

JONESVILLE, January 25, 1863.

Major [C. S.] STRINGFELLOW,

A. A. G., Southwestern Dept.of Virginia [Dept. West Virginia]:

SIR: For the information of Major-General Jones, I have the honor to report that, in obedience to his order to hold the force under my command in such relation to Cumberland Gap as to yield assistance to that point if assailed by a force which was said to be massing at Richmond and at Crab Orchard, I countermanded the orders to my mounted force, then moving back in the direction of Bristol, and directed its return to take position in Powell's Valley, so as to accomplish the object had in view. I directed a supply of ordnance and quartermaster's stores to be sent by rail from Abingdon to Rogersville, Tenn., that being the nearest point to this approachable by rail; distance only 28 miles. I came that way myself to make a reconnaissance of the country. I regret to say that the road is very bad, and transportation by wagon over it, now and for months to come, is and will be impracticable. Clinch, Powell's, and Wallen's Mountains must be crossed in the distance; also Clinch and Powell's Rivers and Wallen's Creek, all frequently unfordable, as was Clinch River when I crossed it this time. After leaving the valley of the Holston, the road runs transversely to all the ranges of mountains and hills, taking the direction of the valleys only for short distances.

Lower ranges of hills are to be found generally parallel to the higher ranges of mountains, which offer serious obstacles to transportation. I have made a calculation, and it would take 1,000 mules to pack the forage for their own subsistence and that of my mounted force over this short portage. Assuming that the corn can be collected at Rogersville, I find it impossible to obtain hay in this country, and it cannot be sent. I have, in consequence of these obstacles, found a great deal of embarrassment in posting the limited of these obstacles, found a great deal of embarrassment in posting the limited force now under my command so as to comply with the orders I have received and to render the service expected of me in case of emergency. From Turkey Cove to Cumberland Gap the supply of forage in Powell's Valley is completely exhausted. The forces from Cumberland Gap have hauled from this country through the whole fall, until the people say they have obtained more than they could spare. Indeed, no supply is anywhere to be seen under shelter