War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0552 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

Search Civil War Official Records

CINCINNATI, July 23, 1863.

General JULIUS WHITE,

Louisa, Ky., via Catlettsburg:

Commence your movement as soon as possible. With the force you now have, you ought not only prevent the enemy coming through the Gap, but to chastise them.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, July 24, 1863-11 a. m.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Nashville, Tenn.:

You must not wait for Johnston to join Bragg, but must move forward immediately against the latter. Take with you hard bread, sugar, coffee, and salt, and push forward rapidly, supplying yourself with forage, bacon, beef, and mutton in the country. Organize supply parties under you quartermaster and commissaries, and live as much as possible on the country. Reduce your trains to the lowest point possible, and move rapidly. There is great disappointment felt here at he slowness of your advance. Unless you can move more rapidly, your whole campaign will prove a failure, and you will have both Bragg and Johnston against you.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL.] HDQRS. OF THE ARMY,

Washington, D. C., July 24, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS, Nashville:

GENERAL: The tone of some of your replies to my dispatches lately would indicate that you thought I was unnecessarily urging you forward. On the contrary, I have deemed it absolutely necessary, not only for the country but also for your own reputation, that your army should remain no longer inactive. The patience of the authorities here has been completely exhausted, and if I had not repeatedly promised to urge you forward, and begged for delay, you would have been removed from the command. It has been said that you are as inactive as was General Buell, and the pressure for your removal has been almost as strong as it has been in his case. I am well aware that people at a distance do not appreciate the obstacles and difficulties which they would see if nearer by;' but, whether well founded or without any foundation at all, the dissatisfaction really exists, and I deem it my duty, as a friend, to represent it to you truly and fairly; and I think I ought to do so, if for no other reason, because it was at my earnest solicitations that you were given the command.

Yours, truly,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS, Cincinnati, July 24, 1863.

General W. S. ROSECRANS:

Your dispatch received. I am sorry to say we have not yet got hold of John [H.] Morgan. He is still out with some 500 of his men, but our