War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0527 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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cretion. He desires you, however, to make a thorough examination of the railroad route in that direction, and also send a part of your force along the Athens and Pulaski road to Columbia. Send a small party also to examine the railroad to Fayetteville. He desires to have the people of Middle Tennessee realize that we have actually taken possession of the country. It appears probable from all accounts that a part of Forrest's train is still in the neighborhood of Pulaski. If this be true, it should be secured. Make short marches, so that your horses may be in even better condition on their return than when they start. There is no pressing emergency in this matter, and it is desirable to have your horses fresh for larger operations to be undertaken soon. The horseshoes you need will be here this morning, and will be forwarded at once.

Your treatment of guerrillas is approved. The lawlessness of which you speak on the part of our soldiers on foraging parties will make bushwhackers faster than any other thing. I have already mentioned, in former dispatch, that the general commanding desires you to gather and send in to the provost-marshal-general all the able-bodied male negroes (slaves of rebel masters) you can find. Your proposed expedition will probably be fruitful in this respect, as well as in the collection of horses and mules. The general commanding thinks one division of your command will be a sufficient force for the expedition.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

P. S. - It seems to be confirmed that John [H.] Morgan has crossed the Ohio at Brandenburg, and now threatens Louisville from the north. Louisville under martial law.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Tullahoma, Tenn., July 10, 1863.

Colonel J. T. WILDER:

The general commanding directs you, as soon as your command is in good condition, to send a detachment, or go with it yourself, to Columbia and Centreville, and explore the country along the Duck River. Make easy marches, so as not to wear out your animals. General Stanley will soon make an expedition, via Huntsville, to Pulaski and Lawrenceburg. He desires to let the people understand that we completely occupy the country. Bring in all the able-bodied male negroes (slaves of rebel masters) you can find, together with horses and mules. The greatest possible care must be taken to prevent pillage and marauding. Make sketches of the fortifications at Columbia, and gather all the intelligence you can. One-half of your command will be sufficient for the expedition. You can be gone six or seven days if necessary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Tullahoma, July 10, 1863.

Major-General STANLEY, Chief of Cavalry:

The general commanding has ordered Colonel Wilder to go on an expedition up Duck River as far as Centreville. This renders it unneces-