War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0514 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

Search Civil War Official Records

with you that it would be well to make another reconnaissance to-morrow, and directs that one be made, in order to learn, if possible, the position of the enemy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. P THRUSTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, July 4, 1863 - 8 a. m.

Major-General BURNSIDE, Cincinnati:

A letter from Jeff. Davis to General Lee, captured from a courier yesterday, states among other things that Bragg, being threatened with attack, and weakened by withdrawing his troops and sending them to Johnston, "has called on Buckner for aid." Meade, after three days' battle near Gettysburg, has the prospect of complete victory. From the letter of Davis you will understand in how tight a place Bragg and Buckner are, and will know whether and how to strike Buckner to prevent him aiding Bragg.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

(Telegraphed by Burnside, same date, to General Hartsuff, Lexington, Ky.)

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, July 4, 1863 - 10.50 a. m.

Major-General BURNSIDE, Cincinnati, Ohio:

Buckner's forces have been called from East Tennessee to re-enforce Bragg, and there can be no considerable force now to prevent your advance.

A rapid movement, living as far as possible on the country, may produce important results. It is not possible for Bragg to make any considerable detachment to oppose you.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, July 4, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Your dispatch of this morning received. All our troops are well down to the front. One party is threatening Abingdon, and another party has gone to destroy Loudon Bridge. Strawberry Plains Bridge and two other important ones are already destroyed, and I hope to throw a considerable force of men into East Tennessee. You know my line is long, and my disposable force small after taking out railroad guards, & c. Morgan broke through our lines at Burkesville yesterday with 4,000 or 5,000 cavalry, and started for the interior of the State. Our forces are concentrating, and we hope to catch him.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.