War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0503 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Tullahoma, Tenn., July 2, 1863.

Colonel J. B. ANDERSON:

Let me know how soon you can have the railroad through to here. Push night and day. I wish you to repair the McMinnville branch, which is but slightly damaged. Make your dispositions accordingly. Do not depend on your own resources alone. I will furnish you any amount of military help you may need. Speed is the only consideration. Answer.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Tullahoma, Tenn., July 2, 1863 - 2 p. m.

Brigadier General JAMES ST. CLAIR MORTON,

Commanding Pioneer Brigade:

Your note by messenger is received, and your proposed route of march is approved. Communicate with General Thomas, at Petty's, and render him any assistance he may need in crossing the river. Communicate also with General Sheridan, who is at the crossing of the Winchester pike, whom you will also assist, if necessary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Tullahoma, Tenn., July 2, 1863.

Major General GORDON GRANGER:

The general commanding directs you to relieve General Van Cleve immediately, and place General Ward in command at Murfreesborough. Hurry the railroad through as soon as possible. Bragg is retreating in the greatest confusion. Our divisions all pressing his rear. Will shatter him badly. The general commanding directs you to send forward telegraph operators to this point at once, if they are not already on the way. Send forward heavy trains of supplies on the railroad as far as it is finished, and get them through as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Tullahoma, July 2, 1863.

Major-General GRANGER, Murfreesborough:

Ascertain what transportation in Murfreesborough has not left, and send it by the Shelbyville pike and thence here. I want all except Crittenden's trains to come this way, by the safest route. The enemy left this position night before last and yesterday. Crossed Elk River, and burned the bridges before we could overtake him in force. We are now pursuing him with eight divisions, and will probably hurt him badly. He left here 500 or 600 sacks of meal, 300 or 400 tents, 3 rifled siege guns, 3 caissons, and a large quantity of cooking utensils. The works and position are nearly as extensive and much stronger than those