War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0469 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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GLASGOW, June 26, 1863-10.50 a. m.

Major-General HARTSUFF, Lexington:

General Hobson with his brigade is 10 miles from here, on Upper Tompkinsville road, water-bound. Twenty-five rebels, with two wagons, were discovered by my patrol this morning within 7 miles of here, on the Lower Tompkinsville road, with forage, going toward Tompkinsville.

JAS. R. HAUGH,

Major, Commanding.

GLASGOW, June 26, 1863-2 p. m.

Major-General HARSTSUFF, Lexington, Ky.:

General Hobson informed me by courier that Morgan designs crossing at Center Point and McWillims' Ford, near Turkey Neck Bend Rebel force in concentrated at these places, and he does not deem it safe to proceed to Tompkinsville with his whole force. He has sent 200 cavalry to Paces and 200 to Tompkinsville, to reconnoiter. County full of small bands. Roads very heavy and water high. General Hobson fears Morgan will try to get to Lebanon, via Edmonton, leaving Tompkinsville 15 miles to their left.

JAS R. HAUGH,

Major, Commanding.

JUNE 26, 1863.

General HARTSUFF, Lexington:

All right. Keep everything ready to move at a moment's notice. The command of Sanders can be stopped at Stanford to rest, instead of coming to Hickman Bridge. All Judah's cavalry should be dashed at Morgan as soon as he gets well across, and, if possible, he should be broken to pieces.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

FORKS OF TRUCE AND TOPKINSVILLE ROADS,

June 26, 1863-2 p. m.

Brigadier-General HOBSON, or

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

I learn from good authority that the enemy are in force at Turkey Neck Bend, below Mashes Creek, said to be under [Adam R.] Johnson and Morgan, numbering 4,000 or 5,000. That place is 8 miles from Tompkinsville. There is also said to be a small force at William Kirkpatrick's mill, grinding corn and shoeing horses. I leave a small force here and at Ray's Cross-Raods, to gather up forage and picket. I will move on at 3 o'clock, to investigate the mill matter.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. J. HARDIN,

Captain, Commanding First Battalion Ninth Kentucky Cavalry.

HUGH KIRKPATRICK'S CUMBERLAND RIVER,

June 26, 1863-7 p. m.

General HOBSON:

I find no enemy on this side of the river. [D. W.] Chenault's fires are in plain view. He has artillery with him. Johnson is at Salt Lick