War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0451 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS,

June 24, 1863-10 p. m.

Major-General SHERIDAN,

Commanding Third Division:

GENERAL: General Rosecrans sends information this evening that General Thomas met with no opposition at Hoover's Gap. This leads General McCook to think that the enemy are drifting to our right, and he has applied to hold General Brannan's force to-morrow, until something definite is developed. The general says he wishes you to be on the lookout for any developments, as stated above.

Respectfully,

G. P. THRUSTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

[Big Spring Branch], June 24, 1863-1.30 p. m.

Brigadier General R. B. MITCHELL,

Commanding First Cavalry Division, Rover:

The general commanding directs that, immediately on receipt of this order, you move your command back by way of Versailles and Middleton, unless there are special reasons for taking some other route, and join Major-General Granger's column, en route to Christiana, on the Shelbyville pike.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Camp near Hoover's Gap, June 24, 1863-9.45 p. m.

Brigadier-General BRANNAN,

Commanding Third Division:

Your note just received. You are directed by the general commanding to march with your command as early as possible to-morrow morning, and join this command. The road comes in at Mr. Brown's.

It you receive no order to the contrary, join the command in front.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. FLYNT,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Big Spring Branch, June 24, 1863-10 p. m.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

The general commanding cannot call at your headquarters to-night, but he desires you to send in a full report of the situation in your front, the position of your force, your opinion of the strength and position of the enemy. How have you succeeded in getting up your train? Do you think we can send our trains across to Bradyville, and thence southward? Are the roads practicable?