War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0387 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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effective force. Moreover, the organization of the Kentucky militia requires your immediate attention.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

LEXINGTON, June 4, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

It would be very dangerous to take any cavalry from this department now, and particularly the Third Kentucky, as the section of country they occupy is full of guerrillas and sympathizers. I have nothing to replace them with. We are cut down to the minimum force necessary to keep your line of communications open, which I take it is all-important to you; but if you think it more important to have the regiment with you, of course I will use my best endeavors to send it.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

SOMERSET, VIA STANFORD, June 4, 1863.

General HARTSUFF:

The wire has been out of order between this and Stanford since yesterday forenoon. Repairers and couriers have been sent out, but have had no notice where damaged. Christ's brigade has moved; left at daylight. Dispatch received this morning from Lieutenant-Colonel Adams from Mill Springs. Advices are he crossed the river some 30 miles below this on yesterday, and captured 6 rebels and 15 horses. He reports fourteen regiments of rebel cavalry on south side of river. I am so much weakened here that I may be overwhelmed. Before Christ left, rebels stated their force was greater than ours. Have you any instructions?

S. P. CARTER,

Brigadier-General.

SOMERSET, June 4, 1863.

Major-General HARTSUFF:

The wire is just in working order for first time since yesterday forenoon. Our force is much weakened by having Christ's brigade detached. Lieutenant-Colonel Adams, First Kentucky Cavalry, who made a dash across the river nearly 30 miles below this yesterday, and captured 6 rebels and 45 horses, reports fourteen rebel cavalry regiments on south side of river.

CARTER,

Brigadier-General.

SOMERSET, June 4, 1863.

Major-General HARTSUFF:

Lieutenant-Colonel Adams reports that he crossed the river at Mill Springs this morning, but advanced only 1 mile. He states the rebels have about 1,000 men at Steubenville, 4 miles from the river, and between 3,000 and 4,000 in and around Monticello, under Pegram. Morgan arrived at Monticello yesterday evening; his strength not known. I have ordered the Second Tennessee from near Waynesburg to this place.

CARTER,

Brigadier-General.