War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0351 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., May 21, 1863-12.30 a. m.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

We have files of rebel papers to the 19th. Our scouts in last evening and to-day satisfy me that from three to seven brigades have left for the south, passing Chattanooga on the 13th and 14th. If I had 6,000 cavalry, in addition to the mounting of the 2,000 now waiting horses, I would attack Bragg within three days. As it is, all my corps commanders and chief of cavalry are opposed to an advance, which, they think, hazards more than the probable gains. Could not all the cavalry possibly disposable be sent down quietly and promptly from all points? The price and the rigorous inspection at Louisville prevents rapid purchases. the quartermaster there telegraphed a few days ago that he was averaging but 9 per day.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, May 21, 1863-3.30 p. m.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

I have only to repeat what I have so often stated, that there is no more cavalry to send you. We have none, and can get none until a draft is made.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

MEMPHIS, May 21, 1863.

General ROSECRANS:

Scouts in from East Tennessee report as follows: Forces moving from Savannah to Linden. A force is crossing at Muscle Shoals south. This is the point at which Kirby Smith crossed to go to Vicksburg last winter. This force is likely crossing the trains of the troops who went south, through Chattanooga, several days since. A heavy force has left Bragg's army to join Joe Johnston before Grant.

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

May 21, 1863-Midnight.

Major-General REYNOLDS,

Commanding Fifth division:

The general commanding directs that Colonel Wilder go out on the Wartrace road; thence across to the Manchester pike, and return to this post. He is to drive in the pickets of the enemy, but not go so far as to get into any serious engagement.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. WILLARD,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.