War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0337 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION .

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he will report fully to his cavalry commander the orders he has received and the disposition of his guard; he will be responsible for the vigilance of the cavalry pickets under his control, and will order such patrols as may be necessary and his force will permit; he will have a perfect understanding with the infantry officer of the day, informing him of the position of his guards, and arranging for speedy communication with the infantry pickets, in case of alarm.

III. Cavalry guards will not be allowed to straggle in and out of the infantry pickets, but will be required to present themselves at the picket line in a body, and to march in regular order to and from their camps and stations.

IV. Cavalry officers of the day, wearing the insignia of their office, will be permitted to pass the pickets by day and (giving the countersign) by night. Officers of the day should always carry the order placing them on duty as such upon their persons during their tour of duty.

By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

C. GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, May 18, 1863-11 a.m.

Major-General BURNSIDE, Cincinnati, Ohio, and

Major-General ROSECRANS, Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

Dispatches just received say that General Joe Johnston, with a considerable force, has left Tennessee to re-enforce Vicksburg. To cover this movement, the enemy will probably threaten an advance, and attempt raids into Kentucky and Tennessee. The best way to counteract this is to concentrate your forces and advance against the enemy in Tennessee, moving, if possible, in such a manner as to threaten East Tennessee.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN.,

May 18, 1863-3.35 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

We have scouts in every direction-on the enemy's flanks, and through his army right and left-and, according to our best information, no considerable force of any arm, and none of infantry, have left our front. How reliable is the information you telegraph? We have information, through the rebel papers, of the moving of perhaps two or three brigades, not to exceed three, west from Charleston. The forces moving are, no doubt, from Charleston and Savannah.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN.,

May 18, 1863-8 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Since your dispatch of 11 to-day, we have arrivals from Shelbyville. They know of no officer leaving Shelbyville, except McCown,

22 R R-VOL XXIII, PT II