War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0289 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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authority to purchase horses in open market in Murfreesborough or Nashville for the emergency. The Secretary's letter of 18th of January gave you this authority, which has not been recalled. Of course, the purchase must be made according to law, that is, with public notice and immediate delivery. Department of the Ohio has supplied your army since November with 14,063 horses and 11,842 mules, of which 7,357 horses were sent from Louisville to Nashville, and 6,706 horses delivered to troops of your army. You need more, and the officers are still buying and shipping to you. Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor reports one-fourth of your horses worn out. Is efficiency gained by service which breaks down horses,taking them beyond their strength? Three cavalry regiments have been broken down by long return marches, without necessity marching 50 miles a day returning to camp.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, April 29, 1863-5.20 p.m,.

(Received 8.49 p.m.)

M. C. MEIGS:

What I learn is that only 29 horses per day are coming in since the new inspector began to be vigorous. We must have speed of delivery as well as quality. Had I 10,000 more mounted force, I could have all the stock and forage the rebels have taken under our noses: with 20,000, I could have cut off the enemy's subsistence from Middle Tennessee and commanded it myself. Our cavalry is one to their five; yet, by hard work, we whip every time. You speak about liberty of buying in my department. I take and buy everything here without money or hesitation. You must conceive the exigency. We can do nothing without horses.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington City, April 29, 1863.

Colonel THOMAS SWORDS,

Assistant Quartermaster-General, Louisville, Ky.:

Secretary of War directs that no effort be spared to fill General Rosecrans' requisitions for horses. General Rosecrans complains that he is not well supplied by the department, and his chief quartermaster, Lieutenant-Colonel Semple, telegraphs that one-fourth of his horses are worn out.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Louisville, Ky., April 29, 1863.

General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, Washington, D. C.;

SIR: On the 27th instant I informed you that 7,357 horses and 11,692 mules had been sent to the quartermaster at Nashville, and 6,706 horses and 150 mules furnished to the troops of General Rosecran's army since November. The figures are made up as follows: 6,872 horses and 11,529

19 R R-VOL XXIII, PT II