War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0286 KY., MID., AND E. TENN., N., ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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brigadier-general, and ordered to report to you. Definite orders in regard to the raising of troops will be transmitted to you shortly.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS,

Louisville, April 28, 1863-2.15 p.m.

Colonel LEWIS RICHMOND:

The following just received:

General BOYLE:

The rebels moved from Wayne to Clinton last week. They are stationed as follows: Chenault at Cook's, near mouth of Beaver Creek; Morrison's Georgia regiment on the Ellis farm, on the road from Monticello to Burkesville, 6 miles northwest of Albany; a regiment at Clinton's, near 76 as picket, regiment at Howard's Mills, 4 miles from Albany, on the road to Burkesville; Johnson's regiment on Henry Johnson's farm,on Wolf River. They are devouring everything. Can be cut off without difficulty. Not over 2,500 in all, and so disposed as not to be able to co-operate, if attacked promptly.

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CINCINNATI, April 28, 1863.

General BOYLE, Louisville, Ky.:

The following dispatch has just been received from Carter:

HALL'S FERRY.

General WILLCOX:

The river is too high to cross either infantry or artillery. Cavalry can cross by swimming their horses. For some distance no rebels can be seen on south side of the river. I have sent Captain [Francis N.] Alexander with 60 picked men and horses across just now, to scout the river between Waitsborough and Mill Springs, to capture any pickets that should be on south side, and to look after boats, so as to enable me to cross infantry, and artillery, provided the enemy has not left Monticello and vicinity. The prospects are we shall have more rain and the river keep up. Do you desire the force to go back to Stanford, as originally designed or have you other plans? No forage along this side of the river for some distance. Have dispatched courier to Colonel Jacob, who, I believe, cannot cross the river.

CARTER.

General.

I have ordered General Willcox to have Carter communicate at once with Colonel Jacob, and to co-operate with him. You can send word to Jacob to move carefully, and not attempt to cross his whole command till he is satisfied that Carter will co-operate with him. You are quite right in ordering down infantry and artillery to protect him in case he has to recross under fire.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

CINCINNATI, April 28, 1863.

General WILLCOX, Lexington:

The following dispatch has just been received from General Boyle:

APRIL 28.

General BURNSIDE:

Manson telegraphs that "Jacob has crossed 200 men at mouth of Greasy Creek, drove the rebel pickets, and took possession of the Narrows, which will enable him to protect the crossing of the remainder. Jacob has not heard anything from Carter