War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0281 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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of water in the Sandy, and my movements must be made at such time as will enable me to avail myself of water transportation. Without at least another regiment, my rear will be without proper protection. Please direct the troops you send to proceed by water to Louisa, and to come with shelter tents.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JULIUS WHITE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO.

Numbers 49.

Cincinnati, Ohio, April 26, 1863.

Brigadier-General H. G. Wright, lately commanding this department, being about to take his departure for the East, the commanding general wishes to publicly express to him his thanks for his cordial co-operation in the movements of this command, and for the assistance he has received from his clear and thorough knowledge of the various interests of the department.

By command of Major-General Burnside:

LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN.,

April 27, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I report in reply to your telegraphic order: This army had, December 1, 1862, 8,709 horses and 11,519 mules, received from the Department of the Ohio. Procured by capture or purchase since 18, 450 horses and 14,607 mules. Sent off, unserviceable, 9,119 horses and 1,149 mules. On hand, March 23, 19,164 horses and 23,859 mules. A great mortality in team animals has resulted from the want of long forage, not procurable, for want of means of transportation. The cavalry horses, always overworked, consume rapidly. It is reported by the chief quartermaster that one-third of the animals now on hand are used up and unserviceable.

Yours, truly,

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, April 27, 1863-4.30 p.m.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

You already have full authority to seize horses in the enemy's country. To seize horses in the loyal States is a very different affair. There is no power here to authorize such a proceeding. The law regulates the purchase of horses, and every possible authority has been given to the quartermaster of your army and of the Western depots to purchase animals for you.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.