War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0270 KY., MID., AND E. TENN., N., ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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What shall be done in this case? I desire the decision of the general commanding this district as a precedent.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. JUDAH

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WESTERN KENTUCKY,

Louisville, April 23, 1863.

Colonel HORACE CAPRON,

Commanding Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry:

COLONEL: Four howitzers, with implements and ammunition, and 367 Burnside carbines and accouterments shipped, April 21, via Cave City and Glasgow. Your last requisition for extra wagons cannot be granted, General Burnside's orders being peremptory.

I heartily congratulate you and your command for their conduct on your fighting the very night of you arrival. Went to the Louisville Journal this morning; a true and good account will be published. Will send you a copy.

I am, and have been, very much engaged. For everything you require send me your orders; I will do my best to oblige you. My respects and best compliments to all your officers, and once more many thanks for your and their kindness. I would have been pleased to come and see you. Unfortunately I am duty bound to remain here. I have been inspecting horses here four days in succession. I received a kick at Oakland's stables; I am lame.

I am and remain, colonel, very truly, your obedient servant,

JULIUS FASSES.

Captain and Assistant Inspector-General of Cavalry.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., April 24, 1863

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

General Stanley went to Louisville with 1,000 men, after horses. He telegraphs there are none. That market is furnishing horses for Saint Louis, Department of the Ohio, &c. Will not our necessities compel us to take horses from Western Kentucky?

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., April 24, 1863.

(Received April 25-12.05 a.m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Cavalry horses are indispensable to our success here. We have always been without the control of the country, except for a short distance beyond our infantry lines, and all the horses and forage the country could furnish have thus fallen into the hands of the enemy. They subsist upon the country by having five to our one of mounted force. Out of our nominal cavalry force, we have not more than forty per cent available, for want of horses. The fruits of victory, when