War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0238 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, April 14, 1863.

General WILLCOX,

Lexington, Ky.:

The following orders have just been sent to General Wright:

Carter confirms the report that the enemy were at Columbia last night. Move your cavalry force from Lebanon on Columbia, via Campbellsville, to co-operate with Carter's force from Hustonville to Columbia. Let the commanding officer keep his scouts well out, to avoid being surprised, in case the enemy should be moving with his whole force on Lebanon. Hold the infantry force at Lebanon, and all the forces at Glasgow, ready to move at a moment's notice, with three days' provisions.

Send me frequent reports, and tell Carter to send full information of the movements of the enemy.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General, Commanding Department of the Ohio.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

No. 39. Cincinnati, Ohio, April 14, 1863.

I. Brigadier General John S. Mason, U. S. Volunteers, is relieved from the command of the District of Ohio, and assigned to the command of the United States forces at Columbus, Ohio.

II. Brigadier General J. D. Cox, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby assigned to the command of the District of Ohio, headquarters at Cincinnati.

By command of Major-General Burnside:

LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

No. 40. Cincinnati, Ohio, April 14, 1863.

All the troops in this command will at once provide themselves with shelter tents, and turn in the others. Only the regulation allowance of wall tents will be allowed to each regiment. Regimental trains must be brought down to regulation allowance, and all he remainder of the wagons will be organized into ammunition and supply trains, and move at the shortest notice.

Forty rounds ammunition will be kept in cartridge-boxes all the time, and 20 additional rounds will be carried in the pockets of each man, to be kept ready for issue before starting on the march.

Sufficient supplies will be kept on hand to fill the wagons with ten days' hard bread and small rations, and three days in haversack.

Beef-cattle for fifteen days' supply will be kept on hand at safe and convenient points, to be driven with the troops. From ten to fifteen days' forage for all the animals should be accumulated as early as possible.

The ammunition trains should contain at least 60 rounds per man, and the batteries should have a full supply on hand all the time.