War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0156 KY., MID., AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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The cavalry posted behind Stone's River allowed a hundred cavalry to come within about 50 yards of their camp.

A. McD. McCOOK,

Major-General.

FRANKLIN, March 21, 1863.

General W. S. ROSECRANS:

All quiet in front. No movement of the enemy reported. The Eighteenth and Twenty-second Michigan, en route from Kentucky, have always belonged to me. I hope you will assign them to my command again.

G. GRANDER,

Major-General.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS,

Bolivar, Tenn., March 21, 1863-Sunrise.

Colonel G. P. THRUSTON, Chief of Staff, Twentieth Army Corps:

COLONEL: The pickets are all quiet on my front in the direction of Versailles and the road leading to Middleton from this place. A little skirmishing has been opened since daylight on my extreme left, near Stone's River. It is now subsided. About 200 cavalry reported at daylight, and I have sent them out on the Middleton road. As soon as I receive a report from them, I will communicate it.

Yours, truly,

JEF. C. DAVIS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Murfreesborough, March 21, 1863.

Major-General THOMAS:

GENERAL: Heavy rebel cavalry force on right of Shelbyville pike and Widow Garaway's. Better have pickets warned and camp in order.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM McMICHAEL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, March 21, 1863.

Brigadier General Q. A. GILLMORE, Lexington, Ky.:

Are you sure enemy are in large force opposite Somerset, or is it only a rebel report to occasion annoyance?

Konkle's battery and One hundred and sixth and One hundred and eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, both small, proceed to Lexington at once. Force could not be sent up Cumberland, on account of want of transportation and time, even if General Rosecrans would consent. He has refused already.

Take Mott's regiment off railroad, except small garrison at stockades if necessary, and I will send a small force from here to replace them.

Boyle's dispatch gives from 3,000 to 5,000 as the enemy's numbers, and these have been always exaggerated.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.