War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0155 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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writers for the proportion to the other arms in a permanent fortification. Not one fourth, perhaps not one-sixth, of the opposing force. If you could spare me the Fourth Missouri Cavalry, from near Iron Mountain, and Merrill's Horse, from the Army of the Potomac, it would do some good. Cannot it be done?

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN.,

March 21, 1863-12 midnight.

Brigadier General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

Captain Dickson, assistant adjutant-general, reports that our mail train from Louisville, which was thrown from the track and very nearly captured by 40 or 50 rebels, about 30 miles south of Bowling Green, was rescued by a detachment of the One hundred and twenty-ninth Illinois, which was guarding the water-tank a couple of miles south of that point. They [the rebels] had been robbing the express car, and got hold of the mail. It was mostly recovered, but as the matter from Washington was less than usual, some apprehension is felt lest a part may have been abstracted. Would it not be well to have copies of any letters from your department, sent at such dates as to have been probably in that mail, forwarded?

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, March 21, 1863-1.45 p.m.

Major General W. S. ROSECRANS, Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

No restriction is placed on your mounting infantry, and cavalry arms and equipments are sent to you as fast as they can be procured; but it is believed that you weaken your force by mounting too many. Mounted infantry are neither good infantry nor good cavalry.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN.,

March 21, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Am much obliged for removing restriction as to mounting infantry. The restriction was put on by the Secretary of War when he refused to mount my light battalions, as I understood. Should only mount as I first proposed, and hope their places will be speedily filled by conscripts.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS,

Murfreesborough, March 21, 1863.

Brigadier General JAMES A. GARFIELD:

I have just returned from the front. General Davis is very handsomely posted, with General Sheridan within a half-hours' march of him. Everything is in excellent shape, and the front is now quiet.