War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0148 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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dred and eighth Ohio are nearly ready, but their numbers are small-about 500 in all. I could make good use of them as guards on the Lexington Railroad. They will be of little service in the field. The invasion of Kentucky, as soon as the roads dry up, is certain, in my judgment, unless and adequate force is sent here to prevent it.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

MURFREESBOROUGH, March 16, 1863.

Major General HORATIO G. WRIGHT, Cincinnati:

Keep all you can get, and get all you can, but remember it is of much less consequence that Kentucky should suffer a raid than that this army should be paralyzed or defeated. Let Kentucky raise her 20,000.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, March 16, 1863.

General HORATIO G. WRIGHT, Cincinnati, Ohio:

The way to stop the raid into Kentucky is to prepare to invade East Tennessee; threaten in several directions and you will scarce them. You ought to move your troops up to Jamestown, if possible. It is as easy to move south as north, and you can get provisions by river if you push at once.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., March 16, 1863.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., March 16, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel H. B. WILSON,

Commanding Forces at Richmond:

COLONEL: I send you the substance of a dispatch received this afternoon from Colonel Wolford. The mail-carrier from London just arrived; reports from 1,000 to 1,200 rebel cavalry from Virginia at Manchester. The mail-carrier went within 4 miles of that place and was turned back. They are expected in London to-night. Court is in session in London at present. Two very suspicious characters came in here last night, and, after calling on a friend to Jeff., they retreated. I desire you to send scouts at once, and ascertain if this report be correct. If a force advances from London toward Richmond that you cannot with certainty whip, order in the force from Irvine to join you. I have directed Colonel Wolford, at Stanford, to keep himself and me informed, and to fight at his discretion, if necessary, calling on the regiment at Danville for support. I don't believe that a rebel force is approaching London equal in strength to you force at Richmond or Colonel Wolford's at Stanford. If they advance toward Stanford, Colonel Wolford is able to take care of them; if they advance toward Richmond, I expect you to do the same thing. Report facts to me often.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.