War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0141 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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flanks and rear with these, backed as best they can, to get Kentucky by these operations, and weaken our front, so as to drive us. Consider this current news of plans. They have assurance of some kind that if they can recover or occupy Tennessee and Kentucky, France and England will interfere.

W. S. ROSECRANS.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, March 14, 1863.

Major General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

The ordnance officers, in the reports last received, state that 2,486 breech-loading carbines still remain in depot at Nashville, and 1,490 at Louisville; also that 485 revolving carbines have gone forward to Nashville in charge of a special messenger. There are also 3,000 pistols at Louisville depot. Are you likely to need or use the whole of them?

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, March 14, 1863.

Brigadier-General SCAMMONY,

Charleston, W. Va.:

What of your proposed raid? Can you make it, and when; and, if not, can you get scouts or loyal men to destroy the bridges? It is very important to do this, and, moreover, the best way to stop rebel incursions is to take the offensive.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., March 14, 1863.

Colonel BENJAMIN P. RUNKLE,

Commanding at Richmond, Ky.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of letter this day addressed to Colonel Walker, commanding at Mount Sterling. The brigadier-general commanding directs me to say that he desires you to place at Colonel Walker's disposal, at Irvine, or between Irvine and Hazle Green, depending on the conveniences of getting forage, a force of 500 or 600 men, with at least six days' rations, with instructions to co-operate with Colonel Walker in his operations against Colonel Cluke. It is believed that corn can be sent from Richmond to Irvine for the animals, and that in the vicinity of Proctor, or on the road the expedition may take, forage can be found. It may not be necessary to go to Proctor. The commanding officer must judge of this. The idea is that this command shall be placed on the road from Hazle Green to Irvine, where forage can be had, there to await instructions from Colonel Walker. I desire that Lieutenant-Colonel Wilson shall be placed in command of this expedition. He should communicate with Colonel Walker at once. It may be advisable for him to report in person at Mount Sterling for that purpose. My opinion is that it