War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0139 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Murfreesborough, March 13, 1863.

Colonel M. B. WALKER,

Commanding First Brigade, Third Division:

COLONEL: You will march with your command and join Brigadier-General Steedman by the same route as directed in former order. The general directs that you make your arrangements to march as far as the termination of the Wilkinson pike to-morrow.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. FLYNT,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS,

Camp on Stone's River, March 13, 1863.

Brigadier General R. S. GRANGER,

Commanding Forces at Versailles, Tenn.:

GENERAL: Your letter of March 12 is received, stating that there is perhaps a force of 3,000 of the enemy at Uninville. General Davis has been ordered to communicate with you, and perhaps he will decide to attack the force at Unionville, in which case General McCook directs that you act under General Davis' orders and support him in all his movements.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. CAMPBELL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

LEXINGTON, KY., March 13, 1863.

Major General HORATION G. WRIGHT,

Commanding Department of the Ohio:

In answer to your letter of the 11th instant, I have the honor to state:

First. That Colonel Runkle's statement will be forwarded to-morrow or by early train on Monday morning. The conduct of Major Williams in abandoning his train at Mount Sterling will be investigated, as will also the conduct of Lieutenant-Colonel [George G.] Miner, Seventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, he precipitately falling back from Richmond and sending unfounded reports to these headquarters.

Second. I note your remarks in reference to the defense of my district against a raid in force. The works are already in progress at Frankfort, and I shall at once commence inexpensive works at the ferries over the Kentucky River.

Third. I do not indorse General Rosecrans' idea that a strong division at Mill Springs or vicinity would be so much isolated as to endanger it, while I have troops at Stanford and Danville, and hold Hickman Bridge over the Kentucky. I will write more fully in a day or two.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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*This dispatch was captured by the Confederate and is among General Polk's papers.

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