War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0135 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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the matter as may be necessary to a full understanding of it. A copy of his report will be promptly furnished to these headquarters, as well as of any other proceedings taken in the case.

The loss by Major Williams of his wagon train also calls for investigation, if the reports that have reached me concerning the affair are true. It is stated that he moved off with his main force, leaving his train to follow under a slender guard, and that its capture was effected by as few as 7 or 8 men.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, March 11, 1863.

Brigadier General Q. A. GILLMORE,

Commanding District of Central Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.:

GENERAL: It seems to me possible that by means of defensive works on no very great scale the city of Lexongton might be made secure by a moderately strong garrison against any force the rebels will be likely to bring against it, thus relieving a part of the troops for general service, which would otherwise be needed for its protection. Similar remarks might be made in reference to Danville, and perhaps some of the crossings of the Kentucky River. Please give me your views upon the subject. If any stout resistance is to be made south of the Kentucky River, the points of defense would seem to be Richmond and Danville. At the former, all the necessary works probably exist now, leaving only the latter to be attended to. The project for these works was considered, and, I believe, decided upon while General Granger was in command of the district. Some strong points of this kind would not only add to our movable force, but give confidence to our troops and probably to the citizens. Some works may also be desirable at Mount Sterling.

I have just received an answer from General Rosecrans to the proposition for him to send a division up the Cumberland to Mill Springs. A copy is inclosed.* I agree with him that a division at that point would be too far from support, and therefore liable to disaster, but I am less any force that may invade Central Kentucky. We must, therefore, depend on our own force to repel any attack. I would advise your increasing the number of your scouts, both toward East Tennessee and Virginia. Money cannot be expended more advantageously than in this way. I desire also that you send scouts in the direction where it is rumored that political and military organizations are forming. Proper persons for such service can seldom be found here.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., March 11, 1863.

Colonel C. J. WALKER, Commanding at Mount Sterling:

COLONEL: Captain Moore, with 240 men from the force at Richmond, had what he called a "small brush" with a portion of Cluke's force at

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*See p. 132.

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