War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0132 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, March 15, 1863.

Copy respectfully furnished to the Adjutant-General, headquarters of the Army, for the information of the General-in-Chief. I agree mainly in the views expressed by General Gillmore, and advise an increase of force for the protection of Kentucky, to be sent with least possible delay. Ten thousand men will not be too many to preserve the State from inroads and to secure its tranquillity.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN.,

March 11, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

General Wright wishes me to send forces to Mill Springs. Says if raids come into Kentucky he will want detachments from here. If the enemy do anything serious there, the worst for us would be to let these forces front us here and swing in their spare forces from the south and east of the Alleghenies. To meet this successfully, the army should be kept in its full strength, and position held against the worst they could do, by withdrawing from Mississippi and concentrating here, or to act offensively in case they weaken on our front, and close them forever against a return out of Kentucky. Fortifications and gathering troops rapidly is the obvious work of General Wright. In either case he will need more gunboats for patrolling.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Murfreesborough, March 11, 1863.

Major General HORATIO G. WRIGHT, Cincinnati:

It would be impracticable at present to detach and place in such isolated position a division up at Mill Springs. I think it of prime importance not to weaken and cup up this army, nor interrupt its steady work of getting supplies and strengthening its position until the enemy shows evident intentions of going out of Middle Tennessee. A raid into Kentucky will not justify weakening us to such an extent as to paralyze. Strong fortifications should be made promptly at principal points in your department, and patrol boats provided to arrest the operations of a strong force. Let them go to Kentucky, and we will close the door against their return.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS,

March 11, 1863.

General GARFIELD, Chief of Staff:

I have just received a dispatch from General Davis, dated yesterday, 8 p. m. He has gone into camp about 1 mile from Triune. General