War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0130 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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wood, Petersburg to Triune, Eagleville, and Versailles, thence to Murfreesborough. I will order him back the moment I dispose of Van Dorn, which I think will be to-morrow.

G. GRANGER,

Major-General.

CROSSING OF RUTHERFORD CREEK, FOUR MILES FROM COLUMBIA,

Via Franklin, March 10, 1863-7 p. m.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

We are here, but with no hopes of crossing the creek; it is too high to ford. The enemy are plainly visible upon the opposite bluff. My information is that they are crossing Duck River as rapidly as possible, and that they intend to fight at Columbia, and that they will be re-enforced by a division of infantry from Bragg. Unless Rutherford Creek is fordable to-morrow, I shall fall back to Franklin, scourging the country to the right and left with my cavalry.

G. GRANGER,

Major-General.

RUTHERFORD CREEK, VIA FRANKLIN,

March 10, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

Cavalry advance just reports artillery in sight, and things looking like a fight.

G. GRANGER,

Major-General.

CARTHAGE, March 10, 1863.

Colonel C. GODDARD,

Asst. Adjt. General and Chief of Staff, Army of the Cumberland:

I could not get sufficient material here to complete my gunboat; will send it down to Nashville to-morrow, to get either baled hay or cotton Also would like to get some heavy guns to place on it. I have two 12-pounders on this boat, and, at a short distance, it cannot be told but what it is bona fide. This only leaves four pieces of artillery here. I send all the other boats, except two, down at same time. If you think it advisable, I will authorize Lieutenant Patten, who has charge of this boat, to fit up another similar to this. I will need no regular gunboats here.

Sunday morning I had 18 wagons, with a guard of two companies of the Eleventh Ohio Volunteers Infantry, captured by 140 guerrillas, cavalry, just outside of my pickets. The commander of the escort, from all accounts, offered no resistance. He was a good officer, but think he must have become flurried. Owing to the on-arrival of the cavalry and gunboats, and much sickness in my camp, I shall move across the Cumberland, at least for the present, for my better safety. I can do nothing on this side without cavalry.

Respectfully,

GEORGE CROOK,

Brigadier-General.