War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0127 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Sergt. William S. Reynolds left Cumberland Ford on Friday, the 6th day of March. Two hundred infantry and 196 cavalry and two pieces of artillery crossed Cumberland River at Mount Pierce fields, into Harlan County, February 28, and went up the river to Harlan Court-House. They were at Manchester on Saturday, March 7. [D. W.] Chenault and [H. M.] Ashby have joined Pegram, by way of Maynardville and Raccoon Valley. He says there are not more than 150 infantry at Morristown; about the same number at Russellville, Hawking County, Tennessee, and about the same number at Rogersville. There are about 600 men at Cumberland Gap, under General Gracie. There are about 30 cavalry at Rogers' Gap, and the same number at Oldtown. He says it is certain that Marshall's force has gone to the salt-works near Abingdon, Va. He says he has information perfectly reliable that Pegram's force at Beaver Creek is not over 6,000 strong.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN.,

March 10, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

From the late rebel papers and our scouts, I am satisfied that a serious raid of mounted men will be undertaken, by the way of Cumberland Gap, as early as practicable. Pegram is now at Clinton, on the Clinch, collecting his men. The rebels say they are stronger now in our front than before the battle. The weather is one continued succession of rains. We think they must intend to hold Middle Tennessee. Forage and supplies must be got, and points of storage, strongly fortified, filled with them. With these we can hold our position without fear from Kentucky. There every nerve should be strained to establish fortified posts, covering certain important entrances and centers, and those well stored with provisions and ammunition. General Wright has probably been doing this, but, if ever the rebels enter the State, necessity will drive them to seek the large towns or died. These should be secured-Louisville, Covington, and Lexington. Something should also be done for Cincinnati while there is leisure.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN.,

March 10, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Your letter about Brannan, and a letter from his brother, saying that, as soon as he sent General Brannan my telegram about his orders, he would at once start, came to-day. Has General Burns resigned, and will his resignation be accepted? I am informed that the rebels are constructing a wagon road across the mountains, from the East Tennessee Valley into North Carolina, above Knoxville, and a branch road is being graded from the Southwest Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, near Morristown, and pointing toward the gap. This affords further indication of a project from that stronghold into Kentucky.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.