War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0112 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Murfreesborough, March 6, 1863.

Major General GORDON GRANGER, Franklin:

Would like full report of Coburn's affair at once; who is to blame that he was not supported, &c.; situation of the enemy, and prospect of attack.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

FRANKLIN, March 6, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

I don't think an attack probable. From all I can learn, the enemy's pickets are strongly posted about 4 miles from town, on the Columbia pike. The main body is supposed to be at Spring Hill. Scouts sent out this morning on Lewisburg and Carter Creek roads have not returned. Expect more accurate information when my flag of truce returns.

G. GRANGER,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Murfreesborough, Tenn., March 6, 1863.

Major-General GRANGER,

Commanding at Franklin:

Your dispatch is received. The general commanding desires to know how soon you can be ready to attack Van Dorn.

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

FRANKLIN, March 6, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

GENERAL: Colonel Coburn did not apply for support, nor did he communicate with General Gilbert during the day at all. Up to the turn in the action, he did not seem to think he would need support, and at that time, had he applied, it would have been too late to have saved the infantry, the distance being 9 miles. When General Gilbert moved out, it was on account of apprehension that all was not right, since he was receiving reports from Colonel Coburn. He stopped the work on the trenches, and set out, leaving this post vacant, trusting to the arrival of General Baird's advance to protect it. If any once is to blame, it is Colonel Coburn, in not keeping General Gilbert advised, and in not approaching the enemy with sufficient caution so as to ascertain his position and strength before attacking three or four times his own numbers in their chosen position.

Respectfully,

G. GRANGER,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, March 6, 1863.

Major General GORDON GRANGER, Franklin:

Now lay your plans well, and clean those fellows out thoroughly if possible. It may become lively if I can get them this side of Duck