War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0109 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

where it is best to act with rigor and where best to be more lenient. You will not be trammeled with minute instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

NASHVILLE, March 5, 1863.

General ROSECRANS:

General Gilbert telegraphs that Colonel Coburn is engaged 6 miles out on the Columbia pike. Heavy artillery firing going on. Am holding troops here in readiness to support Gilbert, if necessary.

G. GRANGER,

Major-General.

[P. S.]-Later dispatch says fight is going on at Spring Hill. Gilbert is going down with his whole force. Baird leaves here at once with his troops.

NASHVILLE, March 5, 1863.

Brigadier-General GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff:

One-half of Baird's command has already gone down on the cars. The other half goes soon, I accompanying.

G. GRANGER,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, March 5, 1863.

Brigadier General C. C. GILBERT, Franklin:

The general commanding directs me to say that he regrets exceedingly that you did not support Coburn and help to bring off the infantry. He desires now that the commanding officer at Franklin keep him fully advised of the strength, position, and movements of the enemy, and give such immediate information as will enable him to give Sheridan proper instructions. We must strike a blow back, to counterbalance the injury we have sustained.

Respectfully,

FRANK S. BOND,

Aide-de-Camp.

MURFREESBOROUGH, March 5, 1863.

Brigadier General C. C. GILBERT, Franklin:

The general commanding desires a fuller and more complete report of the affair in your front. He desires to know what force the enemy have, and the composition of it; whether you were repulsed or routed. Why did Colonel Coburn engage the enemy to such an extent, and what were his instructions?

Respectfully,

FRANK S. BOND,

Aide-de-Camp.