War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0066 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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[Inclosure Numbers 3.]

COLUMBUS, February 9, 1863.

Colonel JOHN A RAWLINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of Tennessee:

May I ask instructions whether Department Orders, Numbers 14, section 4, is again in force, and where I shall send returns and reports, and to whom I shall look for orders?

ASBOTH.

[Inclosure Numbers 4.]

COLUMBUS, February 9, 1863.

[Colonel JOHN A. RAWLINS,]

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of Tennessee:

Reports from Union City, Fort Pillow, and Island Numbers 10 are concurrent in placing an organized force of about 1,000 rebels, with some artillery, on both sides of the Obion River, under command of Colonels Richardson and [W. A.] Dawson, constantly making excursions, marauding the country, and conscripting for the rebel army. As the Obion River is navigable at present to a point above Dyersburg, I am anxious to enter it with a gunboat, and, in co-operation with the garrisons of Island Numbers 10, Union City, and Fort Pillow, to break up and capture these lawless bands, this being the only way to penetrate into the heart of the country occupied by these rebels. I would request orders for the co-operation of two gunboats.

ASBOTH,

Brigadier-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN.,

February 14, 1863 - 9.30 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

The matter of having paymasters stay with the troops is of vital necessity to the collection of the fines arrearages, and balances of indebtedness of officers and men. It is of equal importance to the sick, invalid, and discharged soldiers, who so often cannot get their pay for months, even if at all, for want of correct papers, which would never be the case if the paymasters were with their commands. There is no reason why these majors should be out of the field, while captains in the quartermaster's and commissary departments, with less pay and more labor, are obliged to be so. Please look into this. It is a matter of much moment.

W. S. ROSECRANS.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Murfreesborough, February 14, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

GENERAL: Inclosed I send you a copy of department General Orders, Numbers 19, from these headquarters, directing the formation of rolls of honor and organizing light battalions. Therefore, I respectfully ask your assistance in procuring for them the best arms, and also permission to have given to the members of the rolls of honor medals or ribbons. The measure is highly approved here, and thought to promise the best result. This, and the system of inspection adopted here, are working great changes in this army for the better. We want now the power of