War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0031 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, February 1, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

You have already more than your share of the best arms. Everything has been done, and is now being done, for you that is possible by the Government. Your complaints are without reason. You cannot expect to have all the best arms. The Government cannot give them. Your cavalry is as well armed as that of Grant or Curtis.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., February 1, 1863-1 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Van Dorn, with his command of rebel cavalry, having been starved out in Mississippi, is ordered to join General Bragg. The enemy then will have about 15,000 cavalry in Middle Tennessee.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., February 1, 1863-2 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have direct information that Joe Johnston arrived at Tullahoma on the 27th ultimo, and Van Dorn, who was put in command of the rebel cavalry in Mississippi, has been ordered over here to subsist on the country and interrupt our communication. To meet this emergency we must bring down all the cavalry available, and add to it the mounting of brigades of infantry, for scouting and expeditionary purposes. If you will back me up, I am determined to command the country instead of giving it to the enemy. I shall ask you for things as they are needed. General Wright thinks the Second Ohio Cavalry, at Columbus, and the Tenth, at Cleveland, are not at his disposal. I advised him otherwise, but not having heard from him, advise you of it. Our first want will be arms. Do not be weary of my importunity. No economy can compare with that of furnishing revolving arms. No mode of recruiting will so promptly and efficiently strengthen us. I am about to establish an elite battalion in each brigade, composed of those soldiers from each company, one commissioned and five non-commissioned officers from each regiment, and one field officer from the brigade, to be selected for superior valor and soldierly bearing in battle and on duty. I promise them the best of arms when I can get them, and will mount them for rapid field movement, like flying artillery. Will you please aid me to get the arms? Even installments, to show that they will come some day, will answer. We must create military ardor.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.