War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0014 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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CAIRO, January 25, 1863.

Honorable GIDEON WELLES,

Secretary of the Navy:

Sent yesterday one more light-draught gunboat up Cumberland River, lightly manned. To-day, Lexington will go up, to remain a few days. Have sent Lieutenant Commander S. L. Phelps in her, to examine condition of river and report to me its requirements.

A. M. PENNOCK,

Fleet Captain, Commandant of Station.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., January 26, 1863-2.15 a. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

General Garfield reports to me that there are two regiments of cavalry in Ohio-the Second and Tenth Ohio-that are full and ready for the field. I have telegraphed before of my great need, and that a sufficient force of cavalry is all I require to make to advance, and I earnestly request that these two regiments be ordered to report to me forthwith. I wish to have cavalry enough to destroy the enemy's cavalry, and, this done, I can occupy this whole country with my forces and procure forage enough for my army.

Very truly, yours,

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

MURFREESBOROUGH, January 26, 1863.

Major-General WRIGHT, Cincinnati:

General Paine sends down rumors of a projected raid into Kentucky, by some of Morgan's men, via Burkesville. I would suggest that you have some mounted infantry ready to operate in that direction, should it be necessary.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, January 26, 1863.

Major-General WRIGHT, Cincinnati:

It is a great disappointment to us Granger not starting to-day, as all my dispositions were based on your promise to that effect. Our whole fleet is exposed in consequence of this delay. His two advance brigades ought at least to be ready to start earlier than Friday.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, January 26, 1863.

Brigadier General E. A. PAINE, Gallatin:

Your telegram is received. The general commanding is surprised to learn that there is danger of enemy's crossing the Cumberland. He desires to know why all boats along the river have not been destroyed