War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0833 Chapter XXXV. SCOTT'S RAID IN EASTERN KENTUCKY.

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road. The telegraph line is open Wild Cat. I think my whole command should move to Paint Lick Bridge, and the forces at Danville to Lancaster. Lam afraid to move without orders. On what line will I advance or retire, if obliged to fall back? If his force is under 1,500, he ought to be re-enforced, if possible, and should also be informed of the position assigned to mine or other troops operating the enemy. Please get orders for me soon, or will be no use for me to move at all. If Sanders, falls back and the rebels cross the Kentucky River, my infantry can be of no use. If Sanders can hold them at Richmond or drive them back, we can cut off their by being at Plaint Lick Bridge, or make them scatter and abandon their artillery. A small force should also be sent on Old Lancaster road to Richmond, which, comes into the turnpike this side of Camp Dick Robinson. These dispositions would cover all our trains from Danville and here. Please let me know as soon as possible the general wishes me to do, if anything.

[SAMUEL A.] GILBERT,

Colonel.

GEO. B. DRAKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

General HARTSUFF.

Numbers 4. Reports od Colonel William P. Sanders, Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, commanding mounted troops.

LEXINGTON, July 28, 1863.

GENERAL: Sanders sends the following:

RICHMOND- 1 a. m.

The pickets under Captain Mott had a skirmish with the advance of the rebels (reported 300 strong) about 10 miles from here, between 5 and 6 p. m. and fell back 2 miles, where they now are. Citizens report the force advancing on this road at 4,000 and the same number toward Carb Orchard, and that they are a part of Bragg's force that were cut off. I do not consider it reliable. There are about 550 mounted men here; no artillery.

W. P. SANDERS,

Colonel, Commanding.

There has been nothing else received except what was sent last night.

GEO. B. DRAKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Major General GEORGE L. HARTSUFF.

RICHMOND, july 28, 1863-7.40 a. m.

GENERAL: After skirmishing since daylight, I am now falling back toward the river. The enemy used three pieces of artillery, and I do not estimate the force I saw over 1,000. My position was being turned on the right and left.

CLAY'S FERRY- 10 a. m.

My command, in falling back, became completely panic-stricken; the rear guard rushed into the column, and it was utterly impossible to rally a man. It was an unnecessary panic. Many men are cut off, captured, and some killed and wounded. I will try and form them at this place to protect the ferry, but doubt whether I can do much with them. Ten miles has been a complete and disgraceful rout. I used every means in my power to rally the men, but it was perfectly useless. I don't know who commands the rebels.

SANDERS,

Colonel.

General GEORGE L. HARTSUFF.

53 R R-VOL XXIII, PT I