War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0828 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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JULY 25, 1863.- Skirmish near New Hope Station, Ky.

Reports of Brigadier General Edward H. Hobson, U. S. Army.

LEBANON, KY., July 25, 1863.

CAPTAIN: Captain Dubois, Twelfth Ohio Cavalry, with detachment from his company attacked rebels near New Hope Station. Killed rebel Captain Alexander, wounded several, and scattered the band in every direction. Had 1 man wounded.

E. H. HOBSON,

Brigadier-General.

Captain J. S. BUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

JULY 25-AUGUST 6, 1863.-Scott's raid in Eastern Kentucky.

SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS.

July 25, 1863.-Skirmish at Williamsburg.

26, 1863.-Skirmish at London.

27, 1863.-Skirmish near Rogersville.

28, 1863.-Action at Richmond.

29, 1863.-Skirmish at Paris.

Skirmish at Winchester.

30, 1863.-Skirmish at Irvine.

31, 1863.-Skirmish at Lancaster.

Skirmish at Stanford.

Skirmish at Paint Lick Bridge. August 1, 1863.-Skirmish at Smith's Shoals, Cumberland River.

REPORTS.

Numbers 1.-Major General Ambrose E. Burnside, U. S. Army, commanding Department of the Ohio.

Numbers 2.-Major General George L. Hartsuff, U. S. Army.

Numbers 3.-Colonel Samuel A. Gilbert, Eighth Ohio Cavalry.

Numbers 4.-Colonel Williams P. Sanders, Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, commanding mounted troops.

Numbers 5.-Major James L. Foley, Tenth Kentucky Cavalry, of action at Richmond.

Numbers 6.-Lieutenant Colonel Thomas L. Young, One hundred and eighteenth Ohio Infantry, of skirmish at Paris.

Numbers 7.- W. P. Gall, of skirmish near Winchester.

Numbers 8.-Brigadier General Stephen G. Burbridge, U. S. Army, of skirmish at Paris.

Numbers 9.-Colonel John S. Scott, First Louisiana Cavalry, commanding brigade.

No. 10.-Colonel George W. McKenzie, Fifth Tennessee Cavalry (Confederate).

Numbers 1. Report of Major General Ambrose E. Burnside, U. S. Army, commanding Department of the Ohio.

JULY 31, 1863.

GENERAL: The rebel force under Scott, which I reported as having crossed the Kentucky River, is now in full retreat, in the direction of