War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0824 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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Inclosed you will find a list of killed, wounded, and prisoners of both companies.*

Your most obedient servant,

EDWARD LANGEN,

Major Commanding Detachment Fourth Missouri Volunteers Cavalry.

Captain T. H. HARRIS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

SIR: In accordance with orders from division headquarters, dated the 11th instant, an expedition, consisting of the Second and Fifteenth Missouri Volunteers, left Camp Cowan on the same day, and marched 7 miles on the railroad track, starting at 3.30 p. m. and reaching Tantalon Station at 7 in the evening. Found the track in good order to within 1 1/2 miles of Tantalon, where three bridges across Crow Creek are burned at small intervals. The tunnel is not damaged. The Crow Creek Valley, road which myself and staff were obliged to take, is so much damaged and obstructed by abatis that no vehicles can pass.

Started from Tantalon at 5 a. m., on the 12th instant, and marched 8 miles to Anderson Station. Four large bridges cross Crow Creek, and are, like the rest of the track and small pieces of trestle-work, entirely instant and in pretty good condition. the rails along the whole road are much worn and need repair. The country road also is much better and unobstructed. The mountains open at Tantalon, emitting Crow Creek, whose valley gradually widens into slopes of rich and highly cultivated land, promising an abundant harvest of cereals and stock of whom are deserters from the rebel army, desiring to take the oath of allegiance. They represent the mountains full of deserters, the rebel army much demoralized, and in nearly a starving condition.

On trustworthy information, it appears that the enemy are at the junction below Bridgeport, and that the railroad is uninjured to the Tennessee Bridge, one span of which is burned on the north side of the river. Rumors of two brigades of cavalry having recrossed the Tennessee near Bridgeport, but could be traced to no reliable source. There is a road direct over the mountains from Anderson to Bridgeport, distance only 10 miles to the river, practicable, however, only for cavalry.

The valley road is in good condition and practicable for movements of the necessity of guarding constantly the bridges over Crow Creek, as they are both substantial and very high above the ravines which they span, and would, if destroyed, require a long time to reconstruct.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

JOSEPH CONRAD,

Colonel, Commanding Fifteenth Regiment Missouri Infantry.

Captain GEORGE LEE,

Asst. Adjt. General Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps.

Nominal list, omitted, reports 3 men killed, 8 men wounded, and 3 officers and 90 men captured.