War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0818 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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to me, not one word was said about his crossing the Ohio River; but, on the contrary, he was urged by me to observe the importance of his returning to our army as rapidly as possible. I mate this point apparent as it is one to which my attention was particularly called.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. WHEELER,

Major-General.

Colonel GEORGE WILLIAM BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of Tennessee.

ADDENDA.

McMINNVILLE, June 15, 1863.

Major General JOSEPH WHEELER:

Your dispatch is just received. Can accomplish everything with 2,000 men and four guns. To make the attempt with less, might prove disastrous, as large details will be required at Louisville to destroy the transportation, shipping, and Government property. Can I go? The result is certain.

JOHN H. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.

JULY 3-11, 1863.- Expedition from Beaver Creek, Ky., into Southwestern Virginia, and skirmishes (6th) at Pond Creek, and (7th) Gladesville, Va.

Reports of Brigadier General Julius White, U. S. Army, commanding District of Eastern Kentucky.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF EASTERN KENTUCKY,

Pickeville, July 8, 1863.

Dividing my force at this point, I went up to the State line, on Big Sandy River, in pursuit of the enemy, who fled precipitately beyond my reach. Detaching the Second Battalion Tenth Kentucky Cavalry, and the First Ohio Squadron, I sent them through the Pound Gap, under Major John Mason Brown, who attacked the enemy at Gladesville, killing 14, wounding 20, and capturing 127 prisoners, including the commanding officer [B. E.] Caudill and about 20 other officers. In all our operations thus far our loss has been 1 killed, 13 wounded, and 6 captured while on picket duty.

JULIUS WHITE,

Brigadier-General.

Major General AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF EASTERN KENTUCKY,

Beaver Creek, July 10, 1863.

Since my last dispatch, a detachment of the Sixty-fifth Illinois and Thirty-ninth Kentucky, from this command, under Colonel Dan. Cameroon, have returned from an expedition up the Tug River into West Virginia where they routed and dispersed the enemy, under Buchanan, killing 5 and capturing 20. The enemy took to the cliffs and mountain sides, but the brave Illinoisans and Kentucky vied with each other in climbing the steeps under a galling fire, and driving the enemy from their